Showing posts with label Musings. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Musings. Show all posts

Friday, April 2, 2021

The Connells '74-'75

 


Here's a wonderful version of '74-'75 by The Connells. This is one of those songs that always kicks me in the gut when I hear it. I can't believe it wasn't a bigger hit and I am trying to process how it was the third single from Ring, which was their fifth album. Released in 1995, it was as close to a hit single as the band would get, which is a crime in and of itself.



Normally, your baby boomer/Seventies nostalgia turns me into a bit of a jackass. I love laughing at the misery of people who had a hand in ruining the world. This song is nothing if not clearly, and lovingly exempt from pithy navel gazing and hoary memories about getting buzzed on cheap beer. It's such a great song.

We had it so good in the 1990s. These kids today, they'll never really understand how close we came to perfection. And then the fucking Internet ruined everything.

Tuesday, September 15, 2020

Sometimes the People You Like Are Idiots

 


Ian Brown and Noel Gallagher have revealed themselves to be ignorant jackasses and that's the whole truth and nothing but the truth:

Noel Gallagher has said he refuses to wear a mask during the coronavirus pandemic, complaining that it is a violation of his liberty.

Speaking on the Matt Morgan podcast, the former Oasis guitarist said: “It’s not a law. There’s too many fucking liberties being taken away from us now … I choose not to wear one. If I get the virus it’s on me, it’s not on anyone else … it’s a piss-take. There’s no need for it … They’re pointless.”

Gallagher said he had resisted calls to wear a mask on a train and in shops. “I was going up to Manchester the other week and some guy’s going, ‘Can you put your mask on,’ on the train, ‘because the transport police will get on and fine you a thousand pounds. But you don’t have to put it on if you’re eating.’ So I was saying: Oh right, this killer virus that’s sweeping through the train is gonna come and attack me, but see me having a sandwich and go, leave him, he’s having his lunch?

Oh, and there's also this gem:

Gallagher is not the only Mancunian indie star to have voiced doubt over the coronavirus outbreak. Last week, Stone Roses frontman Ian Brown tweeted: “No lockdown no tests no tracks no masks no vax,” later adding: “So im a Conspiracy Theorist HA! a term invented by the lame stream media to discredit those who can smell and see through the government/media lies and propaganda #researchanddestroy.”
You can safely ignore their advice as far as it relates to protecting your health and staying alive. Wear a mask, maintain social distancing, and get tested if you can. If you test positive, do what you can to avoid spreading the virus.

I mean, what a bunch of fucking idiots. We're still having this debate?

Sunday, September 13, 2020

John Fogerty Explains Why Trump is a Fortunate Son

 

[On] September 10th, Donald “Bone Spurs” Trump held a campaign rally in Freeland, Michigan. He de-planed to Creedence Clearwater Revival’s anti-war classic “Fortunate Son”, and if you’ve ever paid the tiniest bit of attention to the lyrics, you’ll agree with singer John Fogerty that it’s a “confounding” choice.

The moment was recorded in a tweet by Washington Post reporter Dave Weigel, who called it “an entry for the ‘nobody listened to the lyrics’ hall of fame.” The tweet quickly went viral, and today Fogerty issued his response. In a Facebook video called “Meaning behind Fortunate Son,” the legendary rocker broke things down so even a very stable genius could understand.
In Fogerty's own words, the comparison is devastating:
“The very first lines of ‘Fortunate Son’ are, ‘Some folks are born made to wave the flag, ooh their red, white and blue. But when the band plays ‘Hail to the Chief,’ they point the cannon at you.’ Well that’s exactly what happened recently in Lafayette Park. When the President decided to take a walk across the park, he cleared out the area using Federal troops so that he could stand in front of St. John’s church with a Bible. It’s a song I could’ve written now. So I find it confusing, I would say, that that the president has chosen to use my song for his political rallies, when in fact it seems like he is probably the fortunate son.”

There's nothing ambiguous about a John Fogerty song. He lays it out for you. The idiot who played that song before the Trump rally, thinking it would stick it to the libs has to be some sort of unwitting resistance fighter. That's the only thing that makes sense, other than the fact that Trump and his ilk know nothing about American culture.

I find it striking that there aren't already a million kids packed into the open spaces of Washington D.C., demanding an end to the Trump regime. In Fogerty's day, someone like himself had to put on the uniform and be subject to the draft for a war that was opposed at home. That war had to end because the country lost the political will to continue it and this was largely due to the coffins that were coming home and the young people who protested it.

We are in the middle of a pandemic that has killed far more Americans than the entirety of the Vietnam War and yet, here we are in relative comfort and security, watching our democracy die before our eyes. There are protests being met with the most severe repercussions imaginable and this has not caused more people to step out into the fray. Trump is driving people away from the political process by making it as sickening as possible. 

I have to believe that the votes will be there in November. To consider any other possibility is too difficult.

Monday, June 15, 2020

Go Away Haim



I never understood and I never cared for Haim and I don't care about anything they do.

“The whole mantra of this record is about being fearless and not holding yourself back,” Alana Haim told NME last year. At the time, Haim – completed by her sisters Danielle and Este – had only released two songs from their third album (‘Summer Girl’ and ‘Now I’m In It’) but you could sense from that pair’s disparate stylings and sensitive, unguarded subject matters that the LA band had stuck to that idea.

Some seven months and one coronavirus-induced setback later, ‘Women In Music Pt. III’ is the result of that approach – one that’s brought about Haim’s best album yet. It’s bold and brave, but delivered with such confidence and chill that it doesn’t feel like a risk. It captures everything that the world knows and loves about the LA group – their nods back to classic rock, harmonious vocals, and breezy way of being – but throws in some new, surprising twists.

On the follow-up to 2017’s ‘Something To Tell You’, they regularly push themselves out of their comfort zones, experimenting with glitchy electronics (‘I Know Alone’), slatherings of sax (‘Summer Girl’), and dubby syncopation (‘Another Try’, which feels like a sparkier sibling to Lana Del Rey’s cover of Sublime’s ‘Doin’ Time’). Between all of the new, though, the sisters are still experts at deploying irresistible rock, like the rousing, shout-a-long brilliance of ‘The Steps’.

Plenty of people probably disagree with me but I don't care. The world is not all sunshine and roses and I don't have to like your band. In fact, me being unreasonable from time to time helps me make sense of a world where they're going to market a band with three sisters in it by showing them to everyone in their bras or what purports to be some sort of bra but could be a choice made by a consultant hire by the record label.

I like plenty of bands with women in them and all they do is play music. I don't need to see Sleater-Kinney or anyone else decked out like this and exploited by music bros. The songs are fucking derivative and annoying and I think that's what pisses me off the most. I don't actually care what Haim looks like and neither should you. But, Goddamn, what a bunch of hyped up bullshit. 

This is what it sounds like when the worst poseur gets an idea and turns it into a family band. And yes, I fucking hate Kings of Leon why do you ask?

Sometimes, you just have to have an irrational opinion and this is one of them.

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Too Many Hi-Hats




Pearl Drums is asking the question, not me. What would you do with this pile of drums?

Well, for starters, I'd rearrange it. I'd remove the superfluous hi-hats and floor toms and I'd probably add some effects and some trigger pads. I would probably separate this into another set and go from there.

I mean, do you really need this much? Or is this just a trick question?