Thursday, July 18, 2019

Parklife is 25




Blur’s Parklife is celebrating an anniversary:

Blur are to celebrate the 25th anniversary of ‘Parklife’ through the release of a range of vintage merchandise and a previously unreleased ‘Live At the BBC’ session.

The seminal album was released in 1994 and is considered to be one of the defining records of both the 1990s and the Britpop scene.

The group’s label Parlophone confirmed today (July 18) that the ‘BBC Radio 1 Parklife Session’ will be released on August 2 together with a special anniversary collection of ‘Parklife’-era merchandise. You can view and pre-order here.

The anniversary merchandise contains iconic vintage designs that were originally available to buy in the 1990s, including Blur FC and their famous dog track logo.

‘Live at the BBC’ was originally recorded at the BBC in Manchester on March 7, 1994 just weeks ahead of the album’s release on April 25, 1994.

I never got into Blur the way others do; I like a trio of songs, if that, and the rest of it never really settled with me. I am weird that way—I should be a huge Blur fan, but I never got into them, the Super Furry Animals, or Muse at all. There are other bands, too—never understood Keane, Menswear, or Mansun, either.

The important thing is not to be a jerk about it. This is an historic re-release of a huge cultural event. There are tons of important bands and songs that were swallowed up in the 1990s—who genres of music were created and thrashed out during that decade, which was the last gasp before the music industry imploded. I think the next decade or so will be awash in nostalgia for the 1990s, and then it will probably just fade away, but I’ve been wrong about everything all the time.

Tuesday, July 9, 2019

Fat, Drunk, and Stupid is No Way to Go Through Life, Son




I was kind of hoping someone would explain things to Lewis Capaldi, but I guess there is no functioning music industry in the whole of England anymore. It’s one thing to act the clown and get people to listen to you because they don’t know if you’re going to collapse in a heap of your own barf, but, Jeez, dude.

You don’t have to demean yourself to get attention.

You don’t have to make yourself the butt of every joke.

You don’t have to put boxes on your limbs and pretend like you don’t have issues.

You can get up in front of people and sing songs and have fun. I think that’s the most reasonable explanation that is available. Let your songs be your calling card. Be friendly and happy if that’s your thing. You don’t have to be savage and moody and you don’t have to be one of those infighting Gallagher brothers.

Does Capaldi have management? Have they given up?

Friday, July 5, 2019

The Great Glastonbury Cleanup




If you care about the environment, and I know I do, then you’ll be pleased to note that they have been able to clean up the site of this year’s Glastonbury Festival in what seems like record time:

[This has been] one of Glastonbry's greenest festivals in years. 

The clean up after Glastonbury Festival 2019 is 90% complete according to organiser Emily Eavis who has described it as a “massive improvement” on the last.

According to The Guardian, this year’s clean-up is expected to be complete in 4 weeks thanks to the continued good weather. In 2017, it looks teams over 6 weeks to complete the clean-up operation.

On Tuesday, Eavis published a post on Instagram saying that this year, “93.3% of all tents were taken home” after analysing the results of an Ariel site photograph before and after the event.






I’ve yet to figure out how you can abandon a tent, but it makes sense. You spend four or five days throwing up in one, why take it with you?

Monday, July 1, 2019

Janet Weiss




Well, this is sad and somewhat shocking:

"The band is heading in a new direction and it is time for me to move on"

Janet Weiss, the drummer of Sleater-Kinney, has announced her surprise departure from the band after 24 years.

In a statement on Twitter, Weiss said: “After intense deliberation and with heavy sadness, I have decided to leave Sleater-Kinney. The band is heading in a new direction and it is time for me to move on. I will never forget the heights we reached, or the magnificent times Corin, Carrie and I shared.

I don’t care why Weiss left the band, and I don’t think it’s anyone’s business. The music industry is very difficult to understand right now. In one sense it’s easy—there’s no money but you get to play for free! And in another sense, it comes down to whether there are enough people willing to support you and help you through the tough times. For Sleater-Kinney, I would have thought there would be enough of a support system there to let the members have some freedom and some real opportunities to go out and play. But, when you get into a creative setting, things can fall apart. It’s sad, and it’s frustrating, but think of how it is for them.

Some people just get to the end of that road, and they don’t want to play anymore. Some people get to a point where it is just too much of a difficult decision—leave your family, leave the people you love, go on the road, and end up breaking even or less at the end of a tour. Or it’s a great living, and you could do very well, but at what cost? You just never know why people do what they do and why they stop doing what they do.

You can’t begrudge someone who moves on and leaves your favorite band. You can’t hold it against them because, unless you’ve been where Weiss has been, you just can’t know why they need to go in a different direction.